I Don’t Blame Humphries

Harry

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If you can replay the game (maybe the NFL Network will show it) watch where Highsmith sets up. Humphries is in tight, next to the LG. Highsmith is way outside. He simply runs past Humphries before Humphries can get in front of Highsmith. It’s comical. Where’s the line coach? Reset Humphries 2 feet left and that technique won’t work. I expect Highsmith to adjust by trying to split the tackle and guard or the Steelers might blitz that gap. I think Humphries has enough lateral speed to control the inside on that small an adjustment, driving Highsmith towards the middle. As to a blitz, that’s what RBs are for. To sit there and let that technique work more than once is foolish. This type of in game adjustment is what coaches are hired to do.
 

football karma

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they must have adjusted later in the game, because the protection improved
 

Bkbobo

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There were less free runners at Murray this game though. This wasn't like the rams or texans game.

Pass pro was a lot better.
Any correlation that Kyler was under center more often, even if they were running play? I believe playing under center, keeps the defense on it's toes more.

One play I love was Kyler, play action, rolled left and hit McBride for a completion. Simple but effective.
 

Crimson Warrior

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Any correlation that Kyler was under center more often, even if they were running play? I believe playing under center, keeps the defense on it's toes more.

One play I love was Kyler, play action, rolled left and hit McBride for a completion. Simple but effective.

I'm not a huge x's and o's guy bkbobo, but I agree with your first sentence. Maybe it's because the rushers have less idea of where Murray will be vs. him just standing there in the shotgun.

And right? I love that play! (on your 2nd sentence). Any time K1 is using his mobility, the defense is at a disadvantage, and McBride is a dangerous man after the catch.

In the play you mention, I bet 95% of the time a seven yard, slide-and-no-contact, QB keeper is also just sitting there like a big slice of cake (don't know why I like that metophor so much).
 

DaHilg

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I'm not a huge x's and o's guy bkbobo, but I agree with your first sentence. Maybe it's because the rushers have less idea of where Murray will be vs. him just standing there in the shotgun.

And right? I love that play! (on your 2nd sentence). Any time K1 is using his mobility, the defense is at a disadvantage, and McBride is a dangerous man after the catch.

In the play you mention, I bet 95% of the time a seven yard, slide-and-no-contact, QB keeper is also just sitting there like a big slice of cake (don't know why I like that metophor so much).
It’s what the Ravens and Eagles do all day long with less accurate quarterbacks.
 

Chopper0080

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If you can replay the game (maybe the NFL Network will show it) watch where Highsmith sets up. Humphries is in tight, next to the LG. Highsmith is way outside. He simply runs past Humphries before Humphries can get in front of Highsmith. It’s comical. Where’s the line coach? Reset Humphries 2 feet left and that technique won’t work. I expect Highsmith to adjust by trying to split the tackle and guard or the Steelers might blitz that gap. I think Humphries has enough lateral speed to control the inside on that small an adjustment, driving Highsmith towards the middle. As to a blitz, that’s what RBs are for. To sit there and let that technique work more than once is foolish. This type of in game adjustment is what coaches are hired to do.
This is where I said in the game thread that Kyler has to slide up in the pocket as well. There just isn't a way DJ can stop that angle without giving up the inside counter which OTs are taught to not do.
 
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Harry

Harry

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This is where I said in the game thread that Kyler has to slide up in the pocket as well. There just isn't a way DJ can stop that angle without giving up the inside counter which OTs are taught to not do.
The rule about inside has to do with spacing. It is complicated in this case by having a series of weak LGs. If you just move the 2‘ I recommended good timing would let Humphries engage the rusher on his side. He’s a smaller target, but also it’s often easier to move them sideways. TEs often have to make that type of block. Giving up the inside usually happens when an extra rusher is added to overload a side. If the OT takes the outside guy, he opens the inside lane. If you watch a replay Highsmith was by Humphries so quickly and cleanly Highsmith could have simply stayed tight to the line if Murray started forward. Murray wasn’t able to move up without exposing his side.
 
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