It is clear now. The problem is Kliff/Kyler

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I think the offense and calls are very similar with Murray and McCoy, however how each QB interprets the calls and what he sees on the field is the difference. Case in point, that I mentioned on another thread and on Twitter, is how when a WR was clearly called - Colt looked over, saw it wasn't set up well then looks downfield a few yards and hits Hopkins for a 10 yard gain. Murray isn't looking off those types of plays to see what else is developing and just as easy to throw.

The difference is that COLT doesn't hesitate; no patting the ball, bouncing on his toes - he gets the ball out. Like Warner, in his day, he throws, expecting the target to do his job and be there. KM believes that after he processes, his gun will get the job done. (IMO)
 

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Shocking that a 10+ year vet can read a D better than a younger guy. A career backup has lots of time to study and watch film just sayin. Can’t wait to see what happens next, things won’t be as smooth against a decent team. Things went extremely well today guys who can’t catch did, little to no penalties, you know the basic stuff that this team continuously does that kills us didn’t happen today. Did this team all of a sudden fix everything…highly improbable.

Both have 24-hour days. How each prioritizes his use of time is possibly the question.
 

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The difference is that COLT doesn't hesitate; no patting the ball, bouncing on his toes - he gets the ball out. Like Warner, in his day, he throws, expecting the target to do his job and be there. KM believes that after he processes, his gun will get the job done. (IMO)
There was one play in the red zone where Colt threw it to the right expecting Hop to dig in. Hop cut toward the middle so the pass looked bad. It was more of a communication thing and not being the same page. Point is Colt threw it before the break because he thought that's where he would be. Not wait until he was open.
 

daves

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The Athletic had an article a few weeks ago on a day in the life of a backup QB. Coincidentally, it was John Wolford. The amount of studying and preparation that goes into a Wednesday for a QB who does not expect to be starting that week was downright astounding - below are some excerpts.

I wonder how this routine compares to McCoy's, and to Murray's?

5:45-6:15 a.m.: He created voice memos of the play calls for the upcoming game the night before, and reviews them on the drive in to work. "I hear the call, pause the recording, envision the play in my head with the corresponding “can” criteria (I will explain later), call it as if I am in the huddle and think through what defensive looks I should anticipate. I find this is a good way to stay productive in the car and steal some reps."

6:15-7:30 a.m.: He review notes studies film: "My notes at this point of the week revolve around coverage tendencies for normal down and distance (first and second downs). Secondarily, my notes will cover the opponent’s personnel — who are its corners, linebackers, defensive linemen, etc. It is vital to have a good understanding of how your opponent wants to defend you and which players we want to attack and avoid."

7:30-8 a.m.: T-spine mobility, ankle stability and breathing exercises.

8-8:45 a.m.: QB meeting: Run game and play-action pass, including anticipated defensive looks and audibles.

8:45-9:45 a.m.: Lift.

9:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m.: Offensive meetings: Breaking down opposing defensive tendencies on normal down and distance and discussing corresponding play-action, dropback and screen passes to attack those tendencies. "New plays are installed, tweaks are made to existing plays and film is always displayed showing how we anticipate the opponent will defend us. A substantial amount of information and strategy is communicated in this meeting, and my brain is typically fried walking out the door."

12:25-1:15 p.m.: Walk-through: "I receive the play calls in my helmet, recite them to myself and then emulate Stafford’s movements as if I were taking the rep."

1:15-2 p.m.: Lunch/review practice script: "I’m typically not hungry, but I force myself to wolf down a protein and some rice or a banana so I have energy through practice. I subsequently find an empty meeting room to review the practice plan. At this point in the day, the practice plays are scheduled for us, and I will review those play calls and make sure I know all the [audibles] and the intent of each play."

2-2:30 p.m.: Pre-throw warmup routine.

2:30-4:15 p.m.: Practice: "I am running the scout-team offense against the first-team defense. When the first-team offense is up, I am behind the play taking mental reps."

4:15-4:45 p.m.: Post-throw routine.
4:45-6 p.m.: Third-down film study: "I head back to the quarterback meeting room, quickly buzz through practice and turn my attention to third downs (third-down plan is installed Thursday). I watch film cutups of our opponent sectioned into third-and-short, third-and-medium and third-and-long. For example, most teams play more man-to-man coverage in the third-and-short window because they want to contest every throw. Every team is different though, and this is when I dive into the film to understand the tendencies of our next opponent."

6-7 p.m.: Dinner, review play calls: "I am now driving to grab food and head home. I will flip on the voice memo that I listened to in the morning (I add to the memo throughout the day as plays are tweaked)."

7-7:45 p.m.: Isometric arm care.

7:45-9 p.m.: Downtime: "I do my best to wind down an hour before going to bed. This typically entails dim lighting and throwing my blue-light-blocking glasses on."

...dbs
 

Dback Jon

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The Athletic had an article a few weeks ago on a day in the life of a backup QB. Coincidentally, it was John Wolford. The amount of studying and preparation that goes into a Wednesday for a QB who does not expect to be starting that week was downright astounding - below are some excerpts.

I wonder how this routine compares to McCoy's, and to Murray's?

5:45-6:15 a.m.: He created voice memos of the play calls for the upcoming game the night before, and reviews them on the drive in to work. "I hear the call, pause the recording, envision the play in my head with the corresponding “can” criteria (I will explain later), call it as if I am in the huddle and think through what defensive looks I should anticipate. I find this is a good way to stay productive in the car and steal some reps."

6:15-7:30 a.m.: He review notes studies film: "My notes at this point of the week revolve around coverage tendencies for normal down and distance (first and second downs). Secondarily, my notes will cover the opponent’s personnel — who are its corners, linebackers, defensive linemen, etc. It is vital to have a good understanding of how your opponent wants to defend you and which players we want to attack and avoid."

7:30-8 a.m.: T-spine mobility, ankle stability and breathing exercises.

8-8:45 a.m.: QB meeting: Run game and play-action pass, including anticipated defensive looks and audibles.

8:45-9:45 a.m.: Lift.

9:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m.: Offensive meetings: Breaking down opposing defensive tendencies on normal down and distance and discussing corresponding play-action, dropback and screen passes to attack those tendencies. "New plays are installed, tweaks are made to existing plays and film is always displayed showing how we anticipate the opponent will defend us. A substantial amount of information and strategy is communicated in this meeting, and my brain is typically fried walking out the door."

12:25-1:15 p.m.: Walk-through: "I receive the play calls in my helmet, recite them to myself and then emulate Stafford’s movements as if I were taking the rep."

1:15-2 p.m.: Lunch/review practice script: "I’m typically not hungry, but I force myself to wolf down a protein and some rice or a banana so I have energy through practice. I subsequently find an empty meeting room to review the practice plan. At this point in the day, the practice plays are scheduled for us, and I will review those play calls and make sure I know all the [audibles] and the intent of each play."

2-2:30 p.m.: Pre-throw warmup routine.

2:30-4:15 p.m.: Practice: "I am running the scout-team offense against the first-team defense. When the first-team offense is up, I am behind the play taking mental reps."

4:15-4:45 p.m.: Post-throw routine.
4:45-6 p.m.: Third-down film study: "I head back to the quarterback meeting room, quickly buzz through practice and turn my attention to third downs (third-down plan is installed Thursday). I watch film cutups of our opponent sectioned into third-and-short, third-and-medium and third-and-long. For example, most teams play more man-to-man coverage in the third-and-short window because they want to contest every throw. Every team is different though, and this is when I dive into the film to understand the tendencies of our next opponent."

6-7 p.m.: Dinner, review play calls: "I am now driving to grab food and head home. I will flip on the voice memo that I listened to in the morning (I add to the memo throughout the day as plays are tweaked)."

7-7:45 p.m.: Isometric arm care.

7:45-9 p.m.: Downtime: "I do my best to wind down an hour before going to bed. This typically entails dim lighting and throwing my blue-light-blocking glasses on."

...dbs
No dedicated COD time?
 

Jetstream Green

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There was one play in the red zone where Colt threw it to the right expecting Hop to dig in. Hop cut toward the middle so the pass looked bad. It was more of a communication thing and not being the same page. Point is Colt threw it before the break because he thought that's where he would be. Not wait until he was open.
In defense of Kyler, Kyler throwing timing patterns and putting the ball in the air before the route is completed he does often, but only to a guy named D-Hop... that's the problem :)
 

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I think the offense and calls are very similar with Murray and McCoy, however how each QB interprets the calls and what he sees on the field is the difference. Case in point, that I mentioned on another thread and on Twitter, is how when a WR was clearly called - Colt looked over, saw it wasn't set up well then looks downfield a few yards and hits Hopkins for a 10 yard gain. Murray isn't looking off those types of plays to see what else is developing and just as easy to throw.
Very true I noticed it as well on a few occasions. It is called looking the defense/safeties off of where you really want to go with the ball. Get them heading one way with your eyes and then delivering the ball in the opposite direction.
 

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Colt McCoy is 3 and 1 playing with mostly backups in meaningful games early in the season.

Kyler Murray played his best game of a decent season against cleveland, while kliff was out with covid.


Kliff does not call the same game with Colt as he does with Kyler.... he should. That cleveland game was the closest we have ever seen of kyler running the types of plays that kliff dials up for mccoy.

I think given a traditional qb kliff could call a fine game and post winning seasons. However, he has this idea in his head of what kyler is.....and he tries to gameplan around that.
kyler on the other hand does not seem to want to run the type of offense kliff wants to call for him.

IMHO...if kliff dialed up the exact same gameplan for kyler that he does for Colt...we would see a far different kyler murray than we have been.

so the issue with our team isnt kliff or kyler... it is clearly kliff AND kyler....one of them has to go.
It is clear, and when we look back years from now, this tandem will always be remembered for it's failures. Sad really . The owner should be embarrassed.
 

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The Athletic had an article a few weeks ago on a day in the life of a backup QB. Coincidentally, it was John Wolford. The amount of studying and preparation that goes into a Wednesday for a QB who does not expect to be starting that week was downright astounding - below are some excerpts.

I wonder how this routine compares to McCoy's, and to Murray's?

5:45-6:15 a.m.: He created voice memos of the play calls for the upcoming game the night before, and reviews them on the drive in to work. "I hear the call, pause the recording, envision the play in my head with the corresponding “can” criteria (I will explain later), call it as if I am in the huddle and think through what defensive looks I should anticipate. I find this is a good way to stay productive in the car and steal some reps."

6:15-7:30 a.m.: He review notes studies film: "My notes at this point of the week revolve around coverage tendencies for normal down and distance (first and second downs). Secondarily, my notes will cover the opponent’s personnel — who are its corners, linebackers, defensive linemen, etc. It is vital to have a good understanding of how your opponent wants to defend you and which players we want to attack and avoid."

7:30-8 a.m.: T-spine mobility, ankle stability and breathing exercises.

8-8:45 a.m.: QB meeting: Run game and play-action pass, including anticipated defensive looks and audibles.

8:45-9:45 a.m.: Lift.

9:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m.: Offensive meetings: Breaking down opposing defensive tendencies on normal down and distance and discussing corresponding play-action, dropback and screen passes to attack those tendencies. "New plays are installed, tweaks are made to existing plays and film is always displayed showing how we anticipate the opponent will defend us. A substantial amount of information and strategy is communicated in this meeting, and my brain is typically fried walking out the door."

12:25-1:15 p.m.: Walk-through: "I receive the play calls in my helmet, recite them to myself and then emulate Stafford’s movements as if I were taking the rep."

1:15-2 p.m.: Lunch/review practice script: "I’m typically not hungry, but I force myself to wolf down a protein and some rice or a banana so I have energy through practice. I subsequently find an empty meeting room to review the practice plan. At this point in the day, the practice plays are scheduled for us, and I will review those play calls and make sure I know all the [audibles] and the intent of each play."

2-2:30 p.m.: Pre-throw warmup routine.

2:30-4:15 p.m.: Practice: "I am running the scout-team offense against the first-team defense. When the first-team offense is up, I am behind the play taking mental reps."

4:15-4:45 p.m.: Post-throw routine.
4:45-6 p.m.: Third-down film study: "I head back to the quarterback meeting room, quickly buzz through practice and turn my attention to third downs (third-down plan is installed Thursday). I watch film cutups of our opponent sectioned into third-and-short, third-and-medium and third-and-long. For example, most teams play more man-to-man coverage in the third-and-short window because they want to contest every throw. Every team is different though, and this is when I dive into the film to understand the tendencies of our next opponent."

6-7 p.m.: Dinner, review play calls: "I am now driving to grab food and head home. I will flip on the voice memo that I listened to in the morning (I add to the memo throughout the day as plays are tweaked)."

7-7:45 p.m.: Isometric arm care.

7:45-9 p.m.: Downtime: "I do my best to wind down an hour before going to bed. This typically entails dim lighting and throwing my blue-light-blocking glasses on."

...dbs


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