Ellen Page Is Now Elliot Page as Actor Shares Transgender Identity

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His choice, his movies, but yeah.

This I understand. What I don't understand is ''they'' as it's plural. He's definitely one person unless he has multiple personalities. Then I can see the use of they. I want to learn not be a jerk here btw.
 

MigratingOsprey

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This I understand. What I don't understand is ''they'' as it's plural. He's definitely one person unless he has multiple personalities. Then I can see the use of they. I want to learn not be a jerk here btw.

Not always though.

Think of it like when there are reports where they don't want to give away details.

"They victim has brought complaint to the police, they will now with with detectives to determine if there was a crime"

Or similar with juveniles.

"A juvenile at XYZ School was seen with a gun on campus, they were detained without incident"

It does get awkward when there is no antecedent, but there really isn't a clear singular word that exists.

Them/They/Their are very common with an antecedent.

Think "An individual does not need a gendered pronoun if they do not want one"

Slightly clunky with "Elliot does not need a gendered pronoun if they do not want one"

Only thing that has really shifted is that we gave the genetic individual a name.

It's awkward to then go "They do not need a gendered pronoun" for an individual - but it's been done throughout language because there really isn't an alternative

Can avoid it pretty easily though.

"If Elliot wants a donut, just give it to them"

It's those usages that are most common and really not wrong
 

Devilmaycare

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Not always though.

Think of it like when there are reports where they don't want to give away details.

"They victim has brought complaint to the police, they will now with with detectives to determine if there was a crime"

Or similar with juveniles.

"A juvenile at XYZ School was seen with a gun on campus, they were detained without incident"

It does get awkward when there is no antecedent, but there really isn't a clear singular word that exists.

Them/They/Their are very common with an antecedent.

Think "An individual does not need a gendered pronoun if they do not want one"

Slightly clunky with "Elliot does not need a gendered pronoun if they do not want one"

Only thing that has really shifted is that we gave the genetic individual a name.

It's awkward to then go "They do not need a gendered pronoun" for an individual - but it's been done throughout language because there really isn't an alternative

Can avoid it pretty easily though.

"If Elliot wants a donut, just give it to them"

It's those usages that are most common and really not wrong

Good examples. I wish there was an alternative though. I really hate the mixed use between singular and plural since it seems to be getting more use without an antecedent. When reading something I don't want to have to stop and interpret if the author is referring to an individual or a group. It kills the flow and distracts from what the work is about.

I've read a couple things lately that reminded me of when I read Rand's novella Anthem. I'm guessing most people that use they/them wouldn't want to be associated with one of her works. :)
 

puckhead

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Not always though.

Think of it like when there are reports where they don't want to give away details.

"They victim has brought complaint to the police, they will now with with detectives to determine if there was a crime"

Or similar with juveniles.

"A juvenile at XYZ School was seen with a gun on campus, they were detained without incident"

It does get awkward when there is no antecedent, but there really isn't a clear singular word that exists.

Them/They/Their are very common with an antecedent.

Think "An individual does not need a gendered pronoun if they do not want one"

Slightly clunky with "Elliot does not need a gendered pronoun if they do not want one"

Only thing that has really shifted is that we gave the genetic individual a name.

It's awkward to then go "They do not need a gendered pronoun" for an individual - but it's been done throughout language because there really isn't an alternative

Can avoid it pretty easily though.

"If Elliot wants a donut, just give it to them"

It's those usages that are most common and really not wrong

Very helpful, MO. :thumbup:
 
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