Gandhi mock draft

BACH

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Except Gannon's system relies heavily on getting pressure with a four man rush.
A B grade DT is more beneficial than an A grade CB
But it's about talent level and picking players in a bracket. (based on concensus draft sites) There are 4 CBs, 3 DTs and 3 Edge rushers in the "second bracket". If any of those are there at #27 you draft them regarding position, because all three positions are needs.
 
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Gandhi

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Except Gannon's system relies heavily on getting pressure with a four man rush.
A B grade DT is more beneficial than an A grade CB
Yes, but mostly from the two edge rushers. He prefer to use a so-called "Okie front," where the three interior linemen is supposed to take on blockers, so that the edge rushers can run freely. It was a major success with especially Reddick, but it requires a big rotation to make it work well. It is a 5-1 defense, and another essential part is that the three defensive linemen slows down the run by, among other things, playing two-gap (technically 1.5 gap), and thus it is kind of going against the trend of using smaller, faster d-line men, and instead relies heavily on big guys.

The main point is that you need a specific type of defensive linemen. For example, I would be surprised if they select presumed 1st round DTs like Byron Murphy or Johnny Newton, if they get the chance, simply because they might not fit the scheme.
 
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Gandhi

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Round 2

At the end of round one, the players ranked higher on both boards than #35 was:

Edge rusher Chris Braswell, Alabama.

Only other player ranked higher than #35 on the overall board:

Wide receiver Xavier Worthy, Texas.

Wide receiver Keon Coleman, Florida State.


Players ranked inside the #35 on the Cards board, and a little outside #35 on the overall board:

Edge rusher Adisa Isaac, Penn State (#18 and #42).

Safety Javon Bullard, Georgia (#20 and #41).

Defensive tackle Kris Jenkins (#12 and #43).


This was an easy selection. I was not going to trade down, because I think the need is too big to risk losing the best prospect on the board.

#35 – Chris Braswell, edge rusher, Alabama

I really like Braswell (#11 on the Cards board), and I think he would be a great fit in the Cardinals’ 5-1 defense. Contrary to what many thinks, Ojulari had a fine rookie-season, and there is definitely reason to hope for further improvement. However, who is going to rush from the other side? Braswell plays so very powerful and has a lot of potential going forward. He has a lightning quick first step, can bend around the edge, can overpower blockers, can play the run fine. Sure, he needs to do things more consistently, but the talent is certainly there. I think he can produce already as a rookie.

I don’t know if this is a little funfact (but now I have at least mentioned it): At Alabama, Braswell took over for Will Anderson, who many wanted the Cardinals to draft last year, so this would be kind of like coming full circle.

I hope to find a good OG and DT in the third round, though the DTs could potentially wait a bit since the types needed are not necessarily very coveted by other teams. On the other hand, my list of good guard-fits are not that long, so I hope to not miss out.
 
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Gandhi

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Round 3

When my first third round selection (#66) was approaching, I was a little confused as what to do. I tried to trade down a little where I felt more comfortable but was not able to find a trade partner.

My three highest ranked players were:

Cornerback Khyree Jackson, Oregon.

I think that Khyree Jackson is close to what Gannon see as the perfect cornerback stature. Gannon have always worked with big and tall players, that are also capable of playing press man-coverage. Khyree Jackson is all those things, and on top of that he is also very good in zone coverage – by far Gannon’s favorite scheme. However, since I took McKinstry in the first round, I think that this is too early for another cornerback. I am definitely not out of the CB market, but I am not targeting one before a later round.

Edge rusher Adisa Isaac, Penn State.

I think that Isaac is a very exciting prospect and have a lot of untapped potential. But it was the same as with Jackson. I will certainly not rule out drafting another edge rusher, but just not now where I took Chris Braswell earlier.

#66 - Christian Haynes, offensive guard, UCONN.

I did not expect Haynes to be available at this spot. I know that everyone says that about all their picks, but then let me say that I did not want to trade down anyway as my pick approached.

I feel that Haynes is an extraordinary fit in the Cards’ wide zone scheme, which Haynes also have extensive experience in from UCONN. He is a good athlete, has quick feet and very good technique. On top of that, he is very good at handling rushers coming in from the side.

I guess that the reason he might still be available is that he did not measure perfect at the scouting combine. He is a little smaller than you would wish, and he have small hands. Further, he is a bit older prospect (23).

To me, the only issue is that he has played right guard at UCONN, but it seems like a very small problem to move him to the left. I think Haynes would be a plug-and-play OG.
 
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Krangodnzr

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Round 2

At the end of round one, the players ranked higher on both boards than #35 was:

Edge rusher Chris Braswell, Alabama.

Only other player ranked higher than #35 on the overall board:

Wide receiver Xavier Worthy, Texas.

Wide receiver Keon Coleman, Florida State.


Players ranked inside the #35 on the Cards board, and a little outside #35 on the overall board:

Edge rusher Adisa Isaac, Penn State (#18 and #42).

Safety Javon Bullard, Georgia (#20 and #41).

Defensive tackle Kris Jenkins (#12 and #43).


This was an easy selection. I was not going to trade down, because I think the need is too big to risk losing the best prospect on the board.

#35 – Chris Braswell, edge rusher, Alabama

I really like Braswell (#11 on the Cards board), and I think he would be a great fit in the Cardinals’ 5-1 defense. Contrary to what many thinks, Ojulari had a fine rookie-season, and there is definitely reason to hope for further improvement. However, who is going to rush from the other side? Braswell plays so very powerful and has a lot of potential going forward. He has a lightning quick first step, can bend around the edge, can overpower blockers, can play the run fine. Sure, he needs to do things more consistently, but the talent is certainly there. I think he can produce already as a rookie.

I don’t know if this is a little funfact (but now I have at least mentioned it): At Alabama, Braswell took over for Will Anderson, who many wanted the Cardinals to draft last year, so this would be kind of like coming full circle.

I hope to find a good OG and DT in the third round, though the DTs could potentially wait a bit since the types needed are not necessarily very coveted by other teams. On the other hand, my list of good guard-fits are not that long, so I hope to not miss out.
You take Braswell to get sacks, because he was very good at that in college, but just be forewarned that he is atrocious against the run.

I've read scouting reports that say he was a better overall pass rusher than Dallas Turner, but Turner is substantially better at everything else (total package).
 

Krangodnzr

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Round 3

When my first third round selection (#66) was approaching, I was a little confused as what to do. I tried to trade down a little where I felt more comfortable but was not able to find a trade partner.

My three highest ranked players were:

Cornerback Khyree Jackson, Oregon.

I think that Khyree Jackson is close to what Gannon see as the perfect cornerback stature. Gannon have always worked with big and tall players, that are also capable of playing press man-coverage. Khyree Jackson is all those things, and on top of that he is also very good in zone coverage – by far Gannon’s favorite scheme. However, since I took McKinstry in the first round, I think that this is too early for another cornerback. I am definitely not out of the CB market, but I am not targeting one before a later round.

Edge rusher Adisa Isaac, Penn State.

I think that Hayes is a very exciting prospect and have a lot of untapped potential. But it was the same as with Jackson. I will certainly not rule out drafting another edge rusher, but just not now where I took Chris Braswell earlier.

#66 - Christian Haynes, offensive guard, UCONN.

I did not expect Haynes to be available at this spot. I know that everyone says that about all their picks, but then let me say that I did not want to trade down anyway as my pick approached.

I feel that Haynes is an extraordinary fit in the Cards’ wide zone scheme, which Haynes also have extensive experience in from UCONN. He is a good athlete, has quick feet and very good technique. On top of that, he is very good at handling rushers coming in from the side.

I guess that the reason he might still be available is that he did not measure perfect at the scouting combine. He is a little smaller than you would wish, and he have small hands. Further, he is a bit older prospect (23).

To me, the only issue is that he has played right guard at UCONN, but it seems like a very small problem to move him to the left. I think Haynes would be a plug-and-play OG.
I'm extremely leery of tall cornerbacks. Most of them have really stuff hips and can't turn and run well enough at the NFL level. There is a high bust rate with corners over 6'2.

Haynes is an interesting prospect because he moves well. He really struggled one-on-one against top prospects at the Senior Bowl. Really took the shine off of him.
 
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Gandhi

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You take Braswell to get sacks, because he was very good at that in college, but just be forewarned that he is atrocious against the run.

I've read scouting reports that say he was a better overall pass rusher than Dallas Turner, but Turner is substantially better at everything else (total package).
Yes, but he certainly have the potential to improve against the run. However, as you not, it would be because he can rush the passer, if he gets selected. Especially in the Cards' scheme.
 
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Gandhi

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I'm extremely leery of tall cornerbacks. Most of them have really stuff hips and can't turn and run well enough at the NFL level. There is a high bust rate with corners over 6'2.

Maybe, Krang, but I am trying to draft based on what would be good fits, and not so much what I would do myself. Jackson fit the profile that Gannon have worked with as first a defensive back coach and then DC.
Haynes is an interesting prospect because he moves well. He really struggled one-on-one against top prospects at the Senior Bowl. Really took the shine off of him.

I don't fully agree. I think that his Senior Bowl-performance solidified my view on him as a second round prospect.
 
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Gandhi

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I was even more confused when #71 was approaching. I had many players left that will fit the Cardinals well, but I was also starting to feel a little stressed about the D-line. I think that it is a very big need (second behind only WR), and even though they don’t need to be special players in the scheme, they obviously still need to be there. I believe that Bilal Nicols and Justin Jones will be good contributor, but they are not enough. Gannon had success in Philly with a monster NT and a big rotation of other space eaters. However, it is obviously not illegal for them to catch the quarterback, and those types are usually drafted ahead of the big two-gappers who’s primary job is to occupy blockers. Thus, I would like to get into that market soon.

Having said that, my targets were:

Adisa Isaac and Khyree Jackson were obviously still available, but my thinking was the same as five picks before.

Nose tackle McKinnley Jackson, Texas A&M.

I think that Jackson is underrated, or at the least have a lot of untapped potential. I feel like this is a bit too early to draft him, just because of his lack of length and height to help him against blockers, as well as average production, but on the other hand, if I wait until #90 I obviously risk losing him. He is #26 on my Cards board, but I am not sure if the third round is too soon to start focusing almost exclusively on the Cards board (unless someone is by far the best available on the overall board).

Safety Calen Bullock, USC.

I think that Bullock is a good fit in the zone defense. He is very good in a two-high safety system, and yet also have strong ball production. That might be one of the only positions, though, where the need is not that big.

Safety Javon Bullard, Georgia.

Same reason for not drafting him as with Bullock, though he is a slightly different type. First, he is quite a lot shorter, but also quite a lot heavier. Second, he is not the same ballhawk as Bullock, but on the other hand he might be even better in coverage. Bullard can legitimately cover wide receivers.

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#71 – Trade down.

I wanted to trade down to a spot where I was more comfortable with taking any of my targets. As indicated, I didn’t have an obvious choice.

I actually had a deal in place with the Commanders. They would get #71, and I would get #78 and #152 (fifth round). I thought it was a fine deal to move down a little, probably still get one of the targets, and pick up an extra selection. However, in the last minute the Broncos gave me a better offer (#71 for #76 and #145). After some negotiations we landed on #71 for #76, #136 (first pick in fifth round) and #203 (sixth round). I mentioned to the Commanders that I had gotten a better offer, so now they had to throw in another pick if they wanted the deal. They denied, and thus, I traded with the Broncos.

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At #76, all three of my targets were still available, and now I also included WR Jermaine Burton. Actually, he is #28 on the Cards board and #55 on the overall, so maybe he should have been in consideration before. The reason he was not is partly that I took Harrison, but also that Burton is a headache, and could realistically slide further than this. The talent, though, is undeniable, and I think he would fit in well in the Cards’ west coast offense-version. And I am not out of the WR-market, so at some point Burton could become too good of a value-pick.

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#76 – Trade down

As I was on the clock, the Commanders came back with a new trade proposal. This time it was #78 and #222. As I had several targets, and it was only a matter of moving down two spots, I took the offer.
 
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Gandhi

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Now I did not want to trade down anymore. I was targeting different players, and I did not want to lose out on all on them. I was still not that high on taking a safety (though, looking back, maybe I should have considered Bullard more strongly), and my other primary target, Malachi Corley, got drafted one spot ahead of me.

#78 – McKinnley Jackson, nose tackle, Texas A&M

As mentioned earlier, Gannon’s defense needs a huge two-gapping nose tackle in the middle to function. Now, you can get those types later in the draft, but Jackson offers more. He is pretty short, but he uses that to his advantage by playing with a low center of gravity to get under o-linemen’s pads. He is surprisingly quick and mobile for a guy of that size, and he can provide a push on the o-line. You could even say that he is a 5-tech (DE in a 3-4) disguised in a 0 techs body. Though, in the Cards’ scheme, I don’t think there is any doubt what he will be used for, even though it does open up some possibilities.
 
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CardNots

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Now I did not want to trade down anymore. I was targeting different players, and I did not want to lose out on all on them. I was still not that high on taking a safety (though, looking back, maybe I should have considered Bullard more strongly), and my other primary target, Malachi Corley, got drafted one spot ahead of me.

#78 – McKinnley Jackson, nose tackle, Texas A&M

As mentioned earlier, Gannon’s defense needs a huge two-gapping nose tackle in the middle to function. Now, you can get those types later in the draft, but Jackson offers more. He is pretty short, but he uses that to his advantage by playing with a low center of gravity to get under o-linemen’s pads. He is surprisingly quick and mobile for a guy of that size, and he can provide a push on the o-line. You could even say that he is a 3 tech (DE in a 3-4) disguised in a 0 techs body. Though, in the Cards’ scheme, I don’t think there is any doubt what he will be used for, even though it does open up some possibilities.
With the pass happy league, the ability to bat passes down is a huge benefit. Being short on the defensive line is a red flag for me.
 
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Gandhi

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With the pass happy league, the ability to bat passes down is a huge benefit. Being short on the defensive line is a red flag for me.
CN, he has long arms, so it is not much of a problem. And also, as Garth mention, he might not be on the field on obvious passing downs. What he does have, by the way, which is very important in Gannon's scheme, is the ability and willingness to keep going and track down players on screens, play-action and such.
 

Krangodnzr

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Now I did not want to trade down anymore. I was targeting different players, and I did not want to lose out on all on them. I was still not that high on taking a safety (though, looking back, maybe I should have considered Bullard more strongly), and my other primary target, Malachi Corley, got drafted one spot ahead of me.

#78 – McKinnley Jackson, nose tackle, Texas A&M

As mentioned earlier, Gannon’s defense needs a huge two-gapping nose tackle in the middle to function. Now, you can get those types later in the draft, but Jackson offers more. He is pretty short, but he uses that to his advantage by playing with a low center of gravity to get under o-linemen’s pads. He is surprisingly quick and mobile for a guy of that size, and he can provide a push on the o-line. You could even say that he is a 3 tech (DE in a 3-4) disguised in a 0 techs body. Though, in the Cards’ scheme, I don’t think there is any doubt what he will be used for, even though it does open up some possibilities.
He's a guy Id take as well. This DT class has some solid candidates to take in rounds 3-5.

Jackson is a tough guy to move in the middle and the Cardinals could still use another tackle or two since Gannon loves to rotate DL.

DeWayne Carter is another guy to keep an eye on. He had a bit of a down 2023, but his 2022 season was first round caliber. He's a guy who might go higher than mock drafts have him at right now, but if he's available in the third round, you have to seriously consider him.
 
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Gandhi

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DeWayne Carter is another guy to keep an eye on. He had a bit of a down 2023, but his 2022 season was first round caliber. He's a guy who might go higher than mock drafts have him at right now, but if he's available in the third round, you have to seriously consider him.

I selected yesterday, long before reading your post, Krang. ;)
 
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Gandhi

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After the pick of Jackson, there were only 11 picks until I was on the clock again. Bullard got taken shortly after, but Bullock was still on the board, and now these were also in play:

Runningback Jaylen Wright, Tennessee.

I like his running style, and I think he would be a good fit. I don’t know if they need another runningback, but having a third option other than Connor and Carter would not be a bad thing.

Wide receiver Javon Baker, UCF.

Baker is a very good route runner, which WRs need in Petzing’s offense. Other than that, he is primarily a jump ball specialist, but I think that would also complement Michael Wilson and Marvin Harrison well. In my mind, everything is about making life good for Kyler Murray.

Cornerback Renardo Green, Florida State.

I don’t know that the Cards need another corner outside of McKinstry, since they signed Murphy-Bunting and drafted two last year. However, Kei’Trel Clark ended not even being in the game squad for several games late in the season, Antonio Hamilton is now in Atlanta, and I was not impressed with Starling Thomas (though he fought well). Green would certainly primarily be a nickel corner, but that is also fine. By the way, he was one of very few DBs to have a good amount of success against Malik Nabers last season.

Cornerback Caelen Carson, Wake Forest.

The reasoning is the same as with Green, only I am not sure if Carson would actually be best on the outside. He might, and Murphy-Bunting have not been a successful nickel since the Tampa-days. Anyway, I just like Carson’s game a lot, and think he is the exact type of CB that Gannon prefer.

In the end, I went with my sixth target:

#90 – DeWayne Carter, defensive tackle, Duke

I know that Carter is on the small side for a DT in Gannon’s system, but on the other hand, he had success with Javon Hargrave, who has a similar built, in Philly (Hargrave is very good, so that obviously also play a part, but you know…)

Even at his size, Carter plays as a Gannon-DT. He is very strong against the run and more than capable of occupying blockers and play two-gapping technique (technically 1.5 gapping). He is a highly powerful player with a non-stop motor. He can certainly also bring some pass rush, but his strongest side is stopping the run, and that is also what he would do in the Cards’ defense.

I think that the d-line was exposed several times last season, and that they absolutely need reinforcements. I like Bilal Nicols and Justin Jones, but I don’t think it is enough. It requires a strong rotation to make the system work, and I will not rule out that I could take one more defensive lineman later.

There are 13 selections between this and my next, so cross your fingers that some of my targets are still there.
 

Krangodnzr

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After the pick of Jackson, there were only 11 picks until I was on the clock again. Bullard got taken shortly after, but Bullock was still on the board, and now these were also in play:

Runningback Jaylen Wright, Tennessee.

I like his running style, and I think he would be a good fit. I don’t know if they need another runningback, but having a third option other than Connor and Carter would not be a bad thing.

Wide receiver Javon Baker, UCF.

Baker is a very good route runner, which WRs need in Petzing’s offense. Other than that, he is primarily a jump ball specialist, but I think that would also complement Michael Wilson and Marvin Harrison well. In my mind, everything is about making life good for Kyler Murray.

Cornerback Renardo Green, Florida State.

I don’t know that the Cards need another corner outside of McKinstry, since they signed Murphy-Bunting and drafted two last year. However, Kei’Trel Clark ended not even being in the game squad for several games late in the season, Antonio Hamilton is now in Atlanta, and I was not impressed with Starling Thomas (though he fought well). Green would certainly primarily be a nickel corner, but that is also fine. By the way, he was one of very few DBs to have a good amount of success against Malik Nabers last season.

Cornerback Caelen Carson, Wake Forest.

The reasoning is the same as with Green, only I am not sure if Carson would actually be best on the outside. He might, and Murphy-Bunting have not been a successful nickel since the Tampa-days. Anyway, I just like Carson’s game a lot, and think he is the exact type of CB that Gannon prefer.

In the end, I went with my sixth target:

#90 – DeWayne Carter, defensive tackle, Duke

I know that Carter is on the small side for a DT in Gannon’s system, but on the other hand, he had success with Javon Hargrave, who has a similar built, in Philly (Hargrave is very good, so that obviously also play a part, but you know…)

Even at his size, Carter plays as a Gannon-DT. He is very strong against the run and more than capable of occupying blockers and play two-gapping technique (technically 1.5 gapping). He is a highly powerful player with a non-stop motor. He can certainly also bring some pass rush, but his strongest side is stopping the run, and that is also what he would do in the Cards’ defense.

I think that the d-line was exposed several times last season, and that they absolutely need reinforcements. I like Bilal Nicols and Justin Jones, but I don’t think it is enough. It requires a strong rotation to make the system work, and I will not rule out that I could take one more defensive lineman later.

There are 13 selections between this and my next, so cross your fingers that some of my targets are still there.
I really like Renardo Green.

He was one of the most stingy outside corners in the nation last year. He started out as a late 7th rounder until people started looking at the numbers and the tape.

He was elite at timing hits and separating receivers from the ball and he is extremely good at sticking on a receivers hip.

Good speed, good size as well.

Caelen Carson is another CB I'm looking heavily at.

The problem with both, is that they both excel at press man and Gannon likes a lot of off coverages so both might not be a fit.
 
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Gandhi

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Caelen Carson is another CB I'm looking heavily at.

The problem with both, is that they both excel at press man and Gannon likes a lot of off coverages so both might not be a fit.
They both fit - maybe especially Carson. Gannon like to use his cornerbacks in different ways (look at how he deployed Darius Slay and James Bradberry with the Eagles), and often he will give them different play techniques (one for the left guy, one for the right guy).
 
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Gandhi

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#104 gave me problems. With the pick right after me, Jaylen Wright got drafted, and it didn’t take long before the same happened with Renardo Green, Caelen Carson, and Javon Baker. That meant that I did not know what to do, as I only had a few players ranked for that area. They were:

Andru Phillips, cornerback, Kentucky.

The highest ranked player on the Cards board. He plays zone coverage very well, but can also play some press-man, preferably as long as it is as a nickel back. He doesn’t have the size to play on the outside.

Josh Newton, cornerback, TCU.

He does everything well, but nothing extraordinary. He would be a nickel back, and might be a very good fit.

That was it. Other players that I thought about:

Gabriel Murphy, edge rusher, UCLA.

He plays with good technique and a big arsenal of moves. Seems like he has gotten some tips from Laiatu Latu. But I have a big problem with edge rushers with short arms.

Mohamed Kamara, edge rusher, Colorado State.

Very explosive and hand technique. Highly productive. But the same issue as with Murphy. The lack of length bothers me.

Jaheim Bell, H-back, Florida State.

Petzings offense works so much better with a H-back slash fullback. Bell have been used in every possible way in Florida State’s offense, and he have great YAC abilities.

Will Shipley, runningback, Clemson.

Not great between the tackles, but very good receiver and running to the outside. Would be a good fit.

Two of them were ruled out immediately, while I believe that both Bell and Shipley could very well be there later and would be massive reaches here. I tried my best to trade down but could not find a trade partner.

#104 – Andru Phillips, cornerback, Kentucky.

In the end I decided to go with the highest ranked player. And it is not like the Cards cannot use better cover guys, even after I selected McKinstry. Phillips would also surely play the nickel back, but that is fine, as I see McKinstry as a clearcut #1, and Murphy-Bunting is best on the outside. But the defense needs pretty much everything, and Phillips would definitely raise the level. I like Phillips’ game. He is clearly best in zone defense, but he does play very physical and instinctive. His obvious role would be kind of what Jalen Thompson is playing, but Rallis can figure that out.
 

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Yes, but mostly from the two edge rushers. He prefer to use a so-called "Okie front," where the three interior linemen is supposed to take on blockers, so that the edge rushers can run freely. It was a major success with especially Reddick, but it requires a big rotation to make it work well. It is a 5-1 defense, and another essential part is that the three defensive linemen slows down the run by, among other things, playing two-gap (technically 1.5 gap), and thus it is kind of going against the trend of using smaller, faster d-line men, and instead relies heavily on big guys.

The main point is that you need a specific type of defensive linemen. For example, I would be surprised if they select presumed 1st round DTs like Byron Murphy or Johnny Newton, if they get the chance, simply because they might not fit the scheme.

Good stuff, thanks for the insight!
 

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#104 gave me problems. With the pick right after me, Jaylen Wright got drafted, and it didn’t take long before the same happened with Renardo Green, Caelen Carson, and Javon Baker. That meant that I did not know what to do, as I only had a few players ranked for that area. They were:

Andru Phillips, cornerback, Kentucky.

The highest ranked player on the Cards board. He plays zone coverage very well, but can also play some press-man, preferably as long as it is as a nickel back. He doesn’t have the size to play on the outside.

Josh Newton, cornerback, TCU.

He does everything well, but nothing extraordinary. He would be a nickel back, and might be a very good fit.

That was it. Other players that I thought about:

Gabriel Murphy, edge rusher, UCLA.

He plays with good technique and a big arsenal of moves. Seems like he has gotten some tips from Laiatu Latu. But I have a big problem with edge rushers with short arms.

Mohamed Kamara, edge rusher, Colorado State.

Very explosive and hand technique. Highly productive. But the same issue as with Murphy. The lack of length bothers me.

Jaheim Bell, H-back, Florida State.

Petzings offense works so much better with a H-back slash fullback. Bell have been used in every possible way in Florida State’s offense, and he have great YAC abilities.

Will Shipley, runningback, Clemson.

Not great between the tackles, but very good receiver and running to the outside. Would be a good fit.

Two of them were ruled out immediately, while I believe that both Bell and Shipley could very well be there later and would be massive reaches here. I tried my best to trade down but could not find a trade partner.

#104 – Andru Phillips, cornerback, Kentucky.

In the end I decided to go with the highest ranked player. And it is not like the Cards cannot use better cover guys, even after I selected McKinstry. Phillips would also surely play the nickel back, but that is fine, as I see McKinstry as a clearcut #1, and Murphy-Bunting is best on the outside. But the defense needs pretty much everything, and Phillips would definitely raise the level. I like Phillips’ game. He is clearly best in zone defense, but he does play very physical and instinctive. His obvious role would be kind of what Jalen Thompson is playing, but Rallis can figure that out.

Draftniks are loving this Ghandi and I think it's interesting too! Thanks for posting!
 

gmabel830

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Is this being run on a website that we can see? It would be interesting to see all of the picks to understand who has been drafted. #104 was your first pick that I didn't love, but I honestly don't really love any of the guys you mentioned (I've seen Bell, Murphy, and Kamara ranked much lower on boards). Of the list, I'd probably have gone with Shipley, but there are other RBs I like better. Not that I do much in-depth scouting or anything though. You seem to put a lot more time into it than I do. I do a lot of simulators and read their write ups as I go to get a feel for the players, but nothing more than that.
 

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