10 thoughts - 2024 draft

Gandhi

Hall of Famer
Joined
Feb 17, 2007
Posts
1,893
Reaction score
2,526
Location
Denmark
1 - I kind of understand if people think I am overly optimistic when evaluating the draft class, but I think it makes the most sense to look constructive at it. Why not? I cannot change the outcome anyway, so I might as well try to look at it positively and see the added players as resources instead of more or less useless in the short term.

Also, I have always found it strange how many fans make late round picks into redundant and irrelevant. I mean, what?! Why don’t people want to try to upgrade their team? Yes, I am also aware that many late round rookies don’t become successful. I am not aware, though, of why that would make me shrug my shoulders and ignore the chances those picks give.

2 – It is very, very easy for me to say now, but I promise you that thought #12 in my combined review-and-preview column after day two (so the second one I deleted) was something like “Dadrion Taylor-Demerson. Remember that name.” It was because I got my eyes on him when watching the East-West Shrine practices, and then studied him some more after that. He is a great fit in a cover 2-system, and he is the type of player that could become a fan favorite. He will be productive from the start.

3 – Nick Saban called Max Melton his sleeper CB in this draft. When Saban says things like that, I just trust it blindly.

4 – My favorite day three-choice was Xavier Thomas. I studied quite a lot about him in the months leading up to the draft, since his profile and play in the past made him very interesting. What made me prefer other edge rushers was his injury history and short arms (that’s kind of a big deal to me), as well as him being a few years older rookie. Those things combined made me question his developmental potential. However, just last season he showed flashes of great pass rush several times, and the injuries have not taken away his burst, agility and athleticism. I see this pick as this years “Michael Wilson”-pick in that it is a very talented player that has been held back by injuries and just need more stability to become a great rotational player. I expect him to be Ojulari’s backup as the SAM linebacker (edge rusher in their 5-1 defense).

5 – The only thing I know about Tejhuan Palmer is that Mel Kiper and Field Yates have brought him up several times on their weekly draft podcast as a guy to keep an eye on. Also, it means something to me that Drew Terrell (WR coach) was the OC for Palmer at the East-West Shrine Bowl, and thus have almost a week-long impression of him as a player.

6 – For a long time before the draft, I really wanted to like Elijah Jones more than I did, and in my mock draft game, I tried more than once to convince myself that I could defend a pick of him (I never succeeded, by the way). It was because I have seen Jones play at a high level several times, but he doesn’t strike me at all as a Gannon-type, and that makes me question the pick a bit. He is not big enough, strong enough, or play aggressively enough. However, that also makes me wonder what the reason behind the pick might be, and one option I can think of is to have him bulk up. He has the body type for it, and if he can gain maybe 15 pounds, my opinion changes. He certainly has the playing style to fit into a zone-heavy system, so the question is if he can develop into playing that way against bigger and stronger opponents – like a Gannon-CB usually is required to.

7 – The edge rush room looks very scary, but to evaluate it correctly, you need to understand the Cards’ defensive line-scheme. In the box, they primarily use either a 4-2 formation or a 5-1 formation. In the 4-2, the primary edge rushers will be Ojulari and Darius Robinson. In the 5-1, Robinson will most likely line up between the guard and tackle and have one edge rusher next to him. It is in that formation that the edge rush options worry me. Ojulari had a better rookie season than many fans know, but who rush from the other side? As I mentioned earlier, I feel pretty sure that Xavier Thomas will back up Ojulari, and I think that L.J. Collier will back up Robinson. That leaves Zaven Collins, Dimukeje, Gardeck, and Tyreke Smith for the last 5-1 edge rush position. I mean, I guess we can hang our hat on Collins having learned his new position last season, and now will become an All Pro?

So, the gist is that I would have drafted an edge rusher more. Either Adisa Isaac instead of Elijah Jones (Isaac went three picks later), or someone instead of Jaden Davis in the seventh round. I don’t understand the Davis-pick, and I think there were intriguing options on the board. Michigan’s Jaylen Harrell would have been a wonderful fit. The athletic freak Myles Cole would have been a major upside-pick, or it could have been one of either Gabriel Murphy or Braiden McGregor, both of whom went undrafted. My point being that there were options to improve the edge rush.

8 – Tip Reiman was born to play in Petzing’s offensive scheme. You’ll see.

9 – I had never heard about Xavier Weaver before they signed him as a UDFA. Since then, I have researched a bit about him, and it turns out that he has many of the characteristics of a return guy. Maybe they signed him with the goal that he could become the primary returner. Though I am not sure what impact the new rules will have in reality, I do know that the return game will be more important than ever.

The alternative option is that they signed Weaver with the genuine hope that he can become a #4 or #5 WR. Ossenfort said in one of the press conferences that late round draftees and the undrafted guys pretty much had the same draft grade. I assume that means that one of the – reportedly – most attractive WR in the undrafted free agency – who just got the biggest guaranteed contract of all UDFA’s - are basically on equal terms- and level with Tejhuan Palmer.

10 – Myles Murphy is a very interesting UDFA signing, especially because plays a position where there (in my opinion) is a big need. He is another guy that caught my attention at the East-West Shrine Bowl where he showed glimpses of dominant play in the practice sessions and was arguably his teams’ best defender in the game. He is primarily a run stuffer but is not completely incapable of pass rushing. His lack of numbers at North Carolina is mostly because of how he has been used in ways that doesn’t give him many chances for being disruptive, and for that same reason it was very positive to see that side of him too. He fits the type required for a defensive lineman in the Cards’ system, and I don’t consider it impossible that he can beat out the likes of Roy Lopez, Phil Hoskins, Ben Stille, and who else they used last season.

Bonus thought - I like this draft. Outside of Harrison, I don’t see potential for much starpower, but it is a very, very solid draft. Hopefully I am wrong, and some of the draftees turn out to be great, but at least I expect up to 8-9 of them to contribute already this season – in smaller or bigger roles. This is how you built a successful team.
 
OP
OP
Gandhi

Gandhi

Hall of Famer
Joined
Feb 17, 2007
Posts
1,893
Reaction score
2,526
Location
Denmark
That leaves Zaven Collins, Dimukeje, Gardeck, and Tyreke Smith for the last 5-1 edge rush position. I mean, I guess we can hang our hat on Collins having learned his new position last season, and now will become an All Pro?
I guess Ossenfort doesn't expect that either.

xc_hide_links_from_guests_guests_error_hide_media
 

BurqueCardFan

Hall of Famer
Joined
Aug 17, 2006
Posts
1,787
Reaction score
1,761
Location
Albuquerque, NM
1 - I kind of understand if people think I am overly optimistic when evaluating the draft class, but I think it makes the most sense to look constructive at it. Why not? I cannot change the outcome anyway, so I might as well try to look at it positively and see the added players as resources instead of more or less useless in the short term.

Also, I have always found it strange how many fans make late round picks into redundant and irrelevant. I mean, what?! Why don’t people want to try to upgrade their team? Yes, I am also aware that many late round rookies don’t become successful. I am not aware, though, of why that would make me shrug my shoulders and ignore the chances those picks give.

2 – It is very, very easy for me to say now, but I promise you that thought #12 in my combined review-and-preview column after day two (so the second one I deleted) was something like “Dadrion Taylor-Demerson. Remember that name.” It was because I got my eyes on him when watching the East-West Shrine practices, and then studied him some more after that. He is a great fit in a cover 2-system, and he is the type of player that could become a fan favorite. He will be productive from the start.

3 – Nick Saban called Max Melton his sleeper CB in this draft. When Saban says things like that, I just trust it blindly.

4 – My favorite day three-choice was Xavier Thomas. I studied quite a lot about him in the months leading up to the draft, since his profile and play in the past made him very interesting. What made me prefer other edge rushers was his injury history and short arms (that’s kind of a big deal to me), as well as him being a few years older rookie. Those things combined made me question his developmental potential. However, just last season he showed flashes of great pass rush several times, and the injuries have not taken away his burst, agility and athleticism. I see this pick as this years “Michael Wilson”-pick in that it is a very talented player that has been held back by injuries and just need more stability to become a great rotational player. I expect him to be Ojulari’s backup as the SAM linebacker (edge rusher in their 5-1 defense).

5 – The only thing I know about Tejhuan Palmer is that Mel Kiper and Field Yates have brought him up several times on their weekly draft podcast as a guy to keep an eye on. Also, it means something to me that Drew Terrell (WR coach) was the OC for Palmer at the East-West Shrine Bowl, and thus have almost a week-long impression of him as a player.

6 – For a long time before the draft, I really wanted to like Elijah Jones more than I did, and in my mock draft game, I tried more than once to convince myself that I could defend a pick of him (I never succeeded, by the way). It was because I have seen Jones play at a high level several times, but he doesn’t strike me at all as a Gannon-type, and that makes me question the pick a bit. He is not big enough, strong enough, or play aggressively enough. However, that also makes me wonder what the reason behind the pick might be, and one option I can think of is to have him bulk up. He has the body type for it, and if he can gain maybe 15 pounds, my opinion changes. He certainly has the playing style to fit into a zone-heavy system, so the question is if he can develop into playing that way against bigger and stronger opponents – like a Gannon-CB usually is required to.

7 – The edge rush room looks very scary, but to evaluate it correctly, you need to understand the Cards’ defensive line-scheme. In the box, they primarily use either a 4-2 formation or a 5-1 formation. In the 4-2, the primary edge rushers will be Ojulari and Darius Robinson. In the 5-1, Robinson will most likely line up between the guard and tackle and have one edge rusher next to him. It is in that formation that the edge rush options worry me. Ojulari had a better rookie season than many fans know, but who rush from the other side? As I mentioned earlier, I feel pretty sure that Xavier Thomas will back up Ojulari, and I think that L.J. Collier will back up Robinson. That leaves Zaven Collins, Dimukeje, Gardeck, and Tyreke Smith for the last 5-1 edge rush position. I mean, I guess we can hang our hat on Collins having learned his new position last season, and now will become an All Pro?

So, the gist is that I would have drafted an edge rusher more. Either Adisa Isaac instead of Elijah Jones (Isaac went three picks later), or someone instead of Jaden Davis in the seventh round. I don’t understand the Davis-pick, and I think there were intriguing options on the board. Michigan’s Jaylen Harrell would have been a wonderful fit. The athletic freak Myles Cole would have been a major upside-pick, or it could have been one of either Gabriel Murphy or Braiden McGregor, both of whom went undrafted. My point being that there were options to improve the edge rush.

8 – Tip Reiman was born to play in Petzing’s offensive scheme. You’ll see.

9 – I had never heard about Xavier Weaver before they signed him as a UDFA. Since then, I have researched a bit about him, and it turns out that he has many of the characteristics of a return guy. Maybe they signed him with the goal that he could become the primary returner. Though I am not sure what impact the new rules will have in reality, I do know that the return game will be more important than ever.

The alternative option is that they signed Weaver with the genuine hope that he can become a #4 or #5 WR. Ossenfort said in one of the press conferences that late round draftees and the undrafted guys pretty much had the same draft grade. I assume that means that one of the – reportedly – most attractive WR in the undrafted free agency – who just got the biggest guaranteed contract of all UDFA’s - are basically on equal terms- and level with Tejhuan Palmer.

10 – Myles Murphy is a very interesting UDFA signing, especially because plays a position where there (in my opinion) is a big need. He is another guy that caught my attention at the East-West Shrine Bowl where he showed glimpses of dominant play in the practice sessions and was arguably his teams’ best defender in the game. He is primarily a run stuffer but is not completely incapable of pass rushing. His lack of numbers at North Carolina is mostly because of how he has been used in ways that doesn’t give him many chances for being disruptive, and for that same reason it was very positive to see that side of him too. He fits the type required for a defensive lineman in the Cards’ system, and I don’t consider it impossible that he can beat out the likes of Roy Lopez, Phil Hoskins, Ben Stille, and who else they used last season.

Bonus thought - I like this draft. Outside of Harrison, I don’t see potential for much starpower, but it is a very, very solid draft. Hopefully I am wrong, and some of the draftees turn out to be great, but at least I expect up to 8-9 of them to contribute already this season – in smaller or bigger roles. This is how you built a successful team.
As far as your bonus thought goes, with 7 picks in the first 3 rounds, it's sad that only the #4 pick checked that box. They had plenty of ammunition to make a bigger splash but instead choose quantity over quality. It just seemed like we left so much talent on the board when we reached for picks.
I hope Melton turns out to be serviceable but I would have loved to use one of our 3rd's to move up from #27 to get CB Mitchell or Arnold. At that point it would have made it more palatable to move back in round 2 and secure that extra 3rd.
ESPN put out a top 100 draft pick list today. I know it's just one persons opinion but it was nice to see our #27 pick tabbed as the 100th best pick. lol.
 
Last edited:

602 Native

Newbie
Joined
Nov 1, 2023
Posts
45
Reaction score
104
Location
Gilbert
Past pick 4 I really don't put much stock in if guys will be good. If they are good great but at that point the draft is really a crap shoot.

I liked MHJ, Benson, and Reiman but the rest we will see. If they hit on 50% of the picks in the first three rounds everyone should be pleased.
 

Krangodnzr

Captain of Team Murray
Joined
Jul 21, 2002
Posts
35,678
Reaction score
32,715
Location
Orange County, CA
1 - I kind of understand if people think I am overly optimistic when evaluating the draft class, but I think it makes the most sense to look constructive at it. Why not? I cannot change the outcome anyway, so I might as well try to look at it positively and see the added players as resources instead of more or less useless in the short term.

Also, I have always found it strange how many fans make late round picks into redundant and irrelevant. I mean, what?! Why don’t people want to try to upgrade their team? Yes, I am also aware that many late round rookies don’t become successful. I am not aware, though, of why that would make me shrug my shoulders and ignore the chances those picks give.
I look at it much the same way. A draft class doesn't make a team worse...it's just that the teams around you could get a lot better.

We have no control over it, so there is no reason to get all bent out of shape over it. As I have said elsewhere, we have substantially less information than any NFL team. They have met the guys. In some instances (All star games) they have coached the guys.

It's one of the reasons I'm excited about the Adams pick. They picked him over more highly touted guys for a reason, they've seen him up close and personal and know what kind of a player he is.
2 – It is very, very easy for me to say now, but I promise you that thought #12 in my combined review-and-preview column after day two (so the second one I deleted) was something like “Dadrion Taylor-Demerson. Remember that name.” It was because I got my eyes on him when watching the East-West Shrine practices, and then studied him some more after that. He is a great fit in a cover 2-system, and he is the type of player that could become a fan favorite. He will be productive from the start.
DTD is another guy I'm pumped about. I think he's got a good chance of sticking and being a good player. There are a few fourth round picks every year that are like that.

The Cardinals back up safeties were putrid last year and I know we both thought safety was huge need. I liked Kinchens more before the draft because I studied him more, but now that I know DTD a bit more, I'm pretty bullish on his potential.
3 – Nick Saban called Max Melton his sleeper CB in this draft. When Saban says things like that, I just trust it blindly.
Melton was one of my guys. When I started looking at the CB class, he was an obvious target because of his measureables and production. Now that I see the kind of person he is, I think he's got an outside chance of becoming a CB #1. He looks like he wants it.
4 – My favorite day three-choice was Xavier Thomas. I studied quite a lot about him in the months leading up to the draft, since his profile and play in the past made him very interesting. What made me prefer other edge rushers was his injury history and short arms (that’s kind of a big deal to me), as well as him being a few years older rookie. Those things combined made me question his developmental potential. However, just last season he showed flashes of great pass rush several times, and the injuries have not taken away his burst, agility and athleticism. I see this pick as this years “Michael Wilson”-pick in that it is a very talented player that has been held back by injuries and just need more stability to become a great rotational player. I expect him to be Ojulari’s backup as the SAM linebacker (edge rusher in their 5-1 defense).
I glossed over Thomas for the same reasons, but I really see why they like him. Fifth round picks have very little chance of sticking, but when they do it's because they have elite traits. Thomas has quicks for days. He is probably, instantly the quickest edge guy in the roster.

Plus he's from the region my family is from (Pee Dee Region) . That area builds country tough people. Everyone there farms the land and deals with hot, humid, subtropical weather.
5 – The only thing I know about Tejhuan Palmer is that Mel Kiper and Field Yates have brought him up several times on their weekly draft podcast as a guy to keep an eye on. Also, it means something to me that Drew Terrell (WR coach) was the OC for Palmer at the East-West Shrine Bowl, and thus have almost a week-long impression of him as a player.
Palmer was more of a deep sleeper. I like him more than Brendan Rice from what I've seen, albeit it's limited. Another guys, who just like Thomas, has some good trades. Good size, speed, and he exudes toughness.

That's one of the things you see with most of the Cardinals draft picks: toughness. Not to sound too "Mitchy", but this is a collection of guys I'd bring to a fight.
6 – For a long time before the draft, I really wanted to like Elijah Jones more than I did, and in my mock draft game, I tried more than once to convince myself that I could defend a pick of him (I never succeeded, by the way). It was because I have seen Jones play at a high level several times, but he doesn’t strike me at all as a Gannon-type, and that makes me question the pick a bit. He is not big enough, strong enough, or play aggressively enough. However, that also makes me wonder what the reason behind the pick might be, and one option I can think of is to have him bulk up. He has the body type for it, and if he can gain maybe 15 pounds, my opinion changes. He certainly has the playing style to fit into a zone-heavy system, so the question is if he can develop into playing that way against bigger and stronger opponents – like a Gannon-CB usually is required to.
I think the trait that stands out about both Melton and Jones is that they both make plays on the ball. The biggest problem with Marco Wilson is that he didn't make plays on the ball with regularity. Jones does, and he had among the best measureables of any CB in this draft. I routinely took him in my mock drafts
7 – The edge rush room looks very scary, but to evaluate it correctly, you need to understand the Cards’ defensive line-scheme. In the box, they primarily use either a 4-2 formation or a 5-1 formation. In the 4-2, the primary edge rushers will be Ojulari and Darius Robinson. In the 5-1, Robinson will most likely line up between the guard and tackle and have one edge rusher next to him. It is in that formation that the edge rush options worry me. Ojulari had a better rookie season than many fans know, but who rush from the other side? As I mentioned earlier, I feel pretty sure that Xavier Thomas will back up Ojulari, and I think that L.J. Collier will back up Robinson. That leaves Zaven Collins, Dimukeje, Gardeck, and Tyreke Smith for the last 5-1 edge rush position. I mean, I guess we can hang our hat on Collins having learned his new position last season, and now will become an All Pro?
I think you also have to factor in what Justin Jones adds as an interior rusher. There is a reason he got a decent pay day, he brings the ability to collapse the pocket more. While Nichols had a bit of a down year in that regard with the Raiders, he has shown that ability in the past as well.

It's tough to get edge pressure when a QB can easily step up in the pocket and avoid the rush, but the Cardinals have added a few players who can improve the inside rush a bit.

The Cardinals are pretty much relying on improvements from Collins, Ojulari, and Dimukeje, but I agree that Robinson should factor in too at the edge, but I can also see him often rushing from the inside too.
So, the gist is that I would have drafted an edge rusher more. Either Adisa Isaac instead of Elijah Jones (Isaac went three picks later), or someone instead of Jaden Davis in the seventh round. I don’t understand the Davis-pick, and I think there were intriguing options on the board. Michigan’s Jaylen Harrell would have been a wonderful fit. The athletic freak Myles Cole would have been a major upside-pick, or it could have been one of either Gabriel Murphy or Braiden McGregor, both of whom went undrafted. My point being that there were options to improve the edge rush.
The chances that any of those late round guys would improve the edge rush isn't much greater than zero though. Like @Chopper0080 pointed out, the NFL though a lot less of the edge class than pundits did; once the top guys were gone, everyone dropped lower than we anticipated.
8 – Tip Reiman was born to play in Petzing’s offensive scheme. You’ll see.
He was my least favorite pick. I try to tell myself the Cardinals will play a lot of 12, but it was pointed out that even teams who play a lot of 12, no one actually plays 12 that much. He was definitely a luxury pick, but the team did have an obvious need for a blocking TE, and I do like his profile quite a bit.
9 – I had never heard about Xavier Weaver before they signed him as a UDFA. Since then, I have researched a bit about him, and it turns out that he has many of the characteristics of a return guy. Maybe they signed him with the goal that he could become the primary returner. Though I am not sure what impact the new rules will have in reality, I do know that the return game will be more important than ever.

The alternative option is that they signed Weaver with the genuine hope that he can become a #4 or #5 WR. Ossenfort said in one of the press conferences that late round draftees and the undrafted guys pretty much had the same draft grade. I assume that means that one of the – reportedly – most attractive WR in the undrafted free agency – who just got the biggest guaranteed contract of all UDFA’s - are basically on equal terms- and level with Tejhuan Palmer.
Deion Sanders created a buzz about Colorado last year, so I watched 4-5 of their games hoping to see Sanders fail miserably (he did). Weaver was their #2 receiver and was a solid college receiver. More of a possession guy than a big play guy, but he was definitely one of the best UDFAs out there.
10 – Myles Murphy is a very interesting UDFA signing, especially because plays a position where there (in my opinion) is a big need. He is another guy that caught my attention at the East-West Shrine Bowl where he showed glimpses of dominant play in the practice sessions and was arguably his teams’ best defender in the game. He is primarily a run stuffer but is not completely incapable of pass rushing. His lack of numbers at North Carolina is mostly because of how he has been used in ways that doesn’t give him many chances for being disruptive, and for that same reason it was very positive to see that side of him too. He fits the type required for a defensive lineman in the Cards’ system, and I don’t consider it impossible that he can beat out the likes of Roy Lopez, Phil Hoskins, Ben Stille, and who else they used last season.
I found some Tar Heel fan observations and they agreed with your take here. Murphy was asked to take on blocks, but he has some untapped potential as a pass rusher.

My overall draft philosophy is that more swings at the bat, the better. Relying on less picks to make it isn't a sound strategy. And this philosophy extends to the UDFAs because a number of UDFAs have become good players in the past.
Bonus thought - I like this draft. Outside of Harrison, I don’t see potential for much starpower, but it is a very, very solid draft. Hopefully I am wrong, and some of the draftees turn out to be great, but at least I expect up to 8-9 of them to contribute already this season – in smaller or bigger roles. This is how you built a successful team.
I could see a few of these guys becoming stars, but I don't really focus on that line of thinking because it's kind of subjective to what a "star" is.

I believe this draft, even more than the 2023 draft, was about building the core values of what Monti and JG want to establish here: a tough team that will scrap with anyone. They are bringing in bigger receivers who are willing blockers and spending more draft capital on OL than Keim did.
 

CardNots

ASFN Lifer
Joined
Sep 12, 2002
Posts
4,031
Reaction score
3,676
Location
Jenks, Oklahoma
1 - I kind of understand if people think I am overly optimistic when evaluating the draft class, but I think it makes the most sense to look constructive at it. Why not? I cannot change the outcome anyway, so I might as well try to look at it positively and see the added players as resources instead of more or less useless in the short term.

Also, I have always found it strange how many fans make late round picks into redundant and irrelevant. I mean, what?! Why don’t people want to try to upgrade their team? Yes, I am also aware that many late round rookies don’t become successful. I am not aware, though, of why that would make me shrug my shoulders and ignore the chances those picks give.

2 – It is very, very easy for me to say now, but I promise you that thought #12 in my combined review-and-preview column after day two (so the second one I deleted) was something like “Dadrion Taylor-Demerson. Remember that name.” It was because I got my eyes on him when watching the East-West Shrine practices, and then studied him some more after that. He is a great fit in a cover 2-system, and he is the type of player that could become a fan favorite. He will be productive from the start.

3 – Nick Saban called Max Melton his sleeper CB in this draft. When Saban says things like that, I just trust it blindly.

4 – My favorite day three-choice was Xavier Thomas. I studied quite a lot about him in the months leading up to the draft, since his profile and play in the past made him very interesting. What made me prefer other edge rushers was his injury history and short arms (that’s kind of a big deal to me), as well as him being a few years older rookie. Those things combined made me question his developmental potential. However, just last season he showed flashes of great pass rush several times, and the injuries have not taken away his burst, agility and athleticism. I see this pick as this years “Michael Wilson”-pick in that it is a very talented player that has been held back by injuries and just need more stability to become a great rotational player. I expect him to be Ojulari’s backup as the SAM linebacker (edge rusher in their 5-1 defense).

5 – The only thing I know about Tejhuan Palmer is that Mel Kiper and Field Yates have brought him up several times on their weekly draft podcast as a guy to keep an eye on. Also, it means something to me that Drew Terrell (WR coach) was the OC for Palmer at the East-West Shrine Bowl, and thus have almost a week-long impression of him as a player.

6 – For a long time before the draft, I really wanted to like Elijah Jones more than I did, and in my mock draft game, I tried more than once to convince myself that I could defend a pick of him (I never succeeded, by the way). It was because I have seen Jones play at a high level several times, but he doesn’t strike me at all as a Gannon-type, and that makes me question the pick a bit. He is not big enough, strong enough, or play aggressively enough. However, that also makes me wonder what the reason behind the pick might be, and one option I can think of is to have him bulk up. He has the body type for it, and if he can gain maybe 15 pounds, my opinion changes. He certainly has the playing style to fit into a zone-heavy system, so the question is if he can develop into playing that way against bigger and stronger opponents – like a Gannon-CB usually is required to.

7 – The edge rush room looks very scary, but to evaluate it correctly, you need to understand the Cards’ defensive line-scheme. In the box, they primarily use either a 4-2 formation or a 5-1 formation. In the 4-2, the primary edge rushers will be Ojulari and Darius Robinson. In the 5-1, Robinson will most likely line up between the guard and tackle and have one edge rusher next to him. It is in that formation that the edge rush options worry me. Ojulari had a better rookie season than many fans know, but who rush from the other side? As I mentioned earlier, I feel pretty sure that Xavier Thomas will back up Ojulari, and I think that L.J. Collier will back up Robinson. That leaves Zaven Collins, Dimukeje, Gardeck, and Tyreke Smith for the last 5-1 edge rush position. I mean, I guess we can hang our hat on Collins having learned his new position last season, and now will become an All Pro?

So, the gist is that I would have drafted an edge rusher more. Either Adisa Isaac instead of Elijah Jones (Isaac went three picks later), or someone instead of Jaden Davis in the seventh round. I don’t understand the Davis-pick, and I think there were intriguing options on the board. Michigan’s Jaylen Harrell would have been a wonderful fit. The athletic freak Myles Cole would have been a major upside-pick, or it could have been one of either Gabriel Murphy or Braiden McGregor, both of whom went undrafted. My point being that there were options to improve the edge rush.

8 – Tip Reiman was born to play in Petzing’s offensive scheme. You’ll see.

9 – I had never heard about Xavier Weaver before they signed him as a UDFA. Since then, I have researched a bit about him, and it turns out that he has many of the characteristics of a return guy. Maybe they signed him with the goal that he could become the primary returner. Though I am not sure what impact the new rules will have in reality, I do know that the return game will be more important than ever.

The alternative option is that they signed Weaver with the genuine hope that he can become a #4 or #5 WR. Ossenfort said in one of the press conferences that late round draftees and the undrafted guys pretty much had the same draft grade. I assume that means that one of the – reportedly – most attractive WR in the undrafted free agency – who just got the biggest guaranteed contract of all UDFA’s - are basically on equal terms- and level with Tejhuan Palmer.

10 – Myles Murphy is a very interesting UDFA signing, especially because plays a position where there (in my opinion) is a big need. He is another guy that caught my attention at the East-West Shrine Bowl where he showed glimpses of dominant play in the practice sessions and was arguably his teams’ best defender in the game. He is primarily a run stuffer but is not completely incapable of pass rushing. His lack of numbers at North Carolina is mostly because of how he has been used in ways that doesn’t give him many chances for being disruptive, and for that same reason it was very positive to see that side of him too. He fits the type required for a defensive lineman in the Cards’ system, and I don’t consider it impossible that he can beat out the likes of Roy Lopez, Phil Hoskins, Ben Stille, and who else they used last season.

Bonus thought - I like this draft. Outside of Harrison, I don’t see potential for much starpower, but it is a very, very solid draft. Hopefully I am wrong, and some of the draftees turn out to be great, but at least I expect up to 8-9 of them to contribute already this season – in smaller or bigger roles. This is how you built a successful team.
Tejhuan Palmer will make the team’s 53 man roster. I’m calling it now:) I love this kid.
 
OP
OP
Gandhi

Gandhi

Hall of Famer
Joined
Feb 17, 2007
Posts
1,893
Reaction score
2,526
Location
Denmark
Melton was one of my guys. When I started looking at the CB class, he was an obvious target because of his measureables and production. Now that I see the kind of person he is, I think he's got an outside chance of becoming a CB #1. He looks like he wants it.
Yes, I agree. Not that he was one of my guys (great call on you), but I thought he was the right type. Having said that, I was bummed that they didn't take McKinstry, who I think would be a fantastic fit, but I am excited to see what Melton can do. I have high hopes.

I think the trait that stands out about both Melton and Jones is that they both make plays on the ball. The biggest problem with Marco Wilson is that he didn't make plays on the ball with regularity. Jones does, and he had among the best measureables of any CB in this draft. I routinely took him in my mock drafts
Yes, that was why I constantly wanted to like Jones, but I just never convinced myself. He stands out from the type that Gannon have worked with since his Colts-days. That doesn't mean that I don't like Jones, by the way. I could see him being productive in the right role.

I think you also have to factor in what Justin Jones adds as an interior rusher. There is a reason he got a decent pay day, he brings the ability to collapse the pocket more. While Nichols had a bit of a down year in that regard with the Raiders, he has shown that ability in the past as well.

It's tough to get edge pressure when a QB can easily step up in the pocket and avoid the rush, but the Cardinals have added a few players who can improve the inside rush a bit.
I completely agree. Having the pressure from different sides makes it easier for everyone on the defense. I just don't know what the defensive tackles will bring. I mean, especially Javon Hargrave had big production in that role with Gannon in Philly, so it is not impossible, but pass rushing is not the first priority for the d-line. I think that Jones and Nichols are great signings, both because of their abilities and because of the fit, but I am not sure that they are good enough to fill out there role, and being able to provide pass rush.

He was my least favorite pick. I try to tell myself the Cardinals will play a lot of 12, but it was pointed out that even teams who play a lot of 12, no one actually plays 12 that much. He was definitely a luxury pick, but the team did have an obvious need for a blocking TE, and I do like his profile quite a bit.

I think you should see him as Petzing's version of Stefanski's Andy Janovich or Shanahan's Juszczyk. I think it is wrong to label him as just a TE.

I believe this draft, even more than the 2023 draft, was about building the core values of what Monti and JG want to establish here: a tough team that will scrap with anyone. They are bringing in bigger receivers who are willing blockers and spending more draft capital on OL than Keim did.

Ja, I fully agree. That is also how I see it.
 

gmabel830

It's football season!!
Joined
May 8, 2011
Posts
12,657
Reaction score
7,418
Location
Gilbert, Arizona
I hope you are right Outcent! Do you see him beat out Michael Carter easily?
They are different backs who do different things. I think Carter will be 3rd down/change of pace back, while Benson will backup Conner/get limited snaps early with the goal of replacing him after this season when JCs contract is up.
 

Krangodnzr

Captain of Team Murray
Joined
Jul 21, 2002
Posts
35,678
Reaction score
32,715
Location
Orange County, CA
They are different backs who do different things. I think Carter will be 3rd down/change of pace back, while Benson will backup Conner/get limited snaps early with the goal of replacing him after this season when JCs contract is up.
I could see Demercado beating out Carter though. Demercado had some moments last year, and after Carter was signed, Demercado still got plenty of snaps.

I want Carter to win the job because I really like Carter and even liked him back in his Chapel Hill days, but Demercado is cheaper and will be cheaper for years, so its more advantageous for the Cardinals to have Demercado be the #3.
 

CardNots

ASFN Lifer
Joined
Sep 12, 2002
Posts
4,031
Reaction score
3,676
Location
Jenks, Oklahoma
I could see Demercado beating out Carter though. Demercado had some moments last year, and after Carter was signed, Demercado still got plenty of snaps.

I want Carter to win the job because I really like Carter and even liked him back in his Chapel Hill days, but Demercado is cheaper and will be cheaper for years, so its more advantageous for the Cardinals to have Demercado be the #3.
Certainly understand your comments but I will mention this one observation.

Carter earned his keep. We can afford him:) Demercado to the practice squad…
 

Krangodnzr

Captain of Team Murray
Joined
Jul 21, 2002
Posts
35,678
Reaction score
32,715
Location
Orange County, CA
Certainly understand your comments but I will mention this one observation.

Carter earned his keep. We can afford him:) Demercado to the practice squad…
I've been wrong before, but Demercado is the type of cheap do-it-all kind of RB who won't hang around a PS.
 

Proximo

ASFN Icon
Joined
Mar 8, 2015
Posts
12,252
Reaction score
9,949
I'm more that a little concerned

We still have a big hole and not much depth

There has to be more moves coming
Doesn't have to be. Those two guy we picked up as a free agent and late in the draft could perform well in mini camp. Considering every team has 90 guys right now the additions to the room might wait till cut downs.
 

QuebecCard

ASFN Addict
Joined
Mar 12, 2021
Posts
5,259
Reaction score
7,492
Location
North of the 49th.
I could see Demercado beating out Carter though. Demercado had some moments last year, and after Carter was signed, Demercado still got plenty of snaps.

I want Carter to win the job because I really like Carter and even liked him back in his Chapel Hill days, but Demercado is cheaper and will be cheaper for years, so its more advantageous for the Cardinals to have Demercado be the #3.

I think CARTER offers something different. One could imagine DEMERCADO stepping in for CONNORS last season as a between-the-tackles RB, but we've now drafted BENSON, who fills that latter role and then some.
 
OP
OP
Gandhi

Gandhi

Hall of Famer
Joined
Feb 17, 2007
Posts
1,893
Reaction score
2,526
Location
Denmark
Krang, I was a little busy when I answered yesterday, so there were a few points I did not get to comment on.

I glossed over Thomas for the same reasons, but I really see why they like him. Fifth round picks have very little chance of sticking, but when they do it's because they have elite traits. Thomas has quicks for days. He is probably, instantly the quickest edge guy in the roster.
I don’t know.I would be highly disappointed if they cut him after camp.

The chances that any of those late round guys would improve the edge rush isn't much greater than zero though.
If we go back just a few years, I can find several late round picked edge rushers that he made a difference as rookies. Tarron Jackson in 2021, even with Jonathan Gannon himself as DC. Dimukeje was a sixth-round pick. Jonothan Cooper, Broncos 2021. James Houston, Lions 2022. Isaiah Thomas, Browns 2022. And there is probably more. It is not that far out to believe that they ones I mentioned could produce already as rookies.
 

dreamcastrocks

Chopped Liver Moderator
Super Moderator
Moderator
Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2005
Posts
46,069
Reaction score
11,611
I think CARTER offers something different. One could imagine DEMERCADO stepping in for CONNORS last season as a between-the-tackles RB, but we've now drafted BENSON, who fills that latter role and then some.
Right, but Demercado seems to play much more special teams than Carter and that is often the deciding factor at the end of a roster.
 
OP
OP
Gandhi

Gandhi

Hall of Famer
Joined
Feb 17, 2007
Posts
1,893
Reaction score
2,526
Location
Denmark
They are different backs who do different things. I think Carter will be 3rd down/change of pace back, while Benson will backup Conner/get limited snaps early with the goal of replacing him after this season when JCs contract is up.
To that point, CBS has a list of instant impact rookies (https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/...son-jc-latham-featured-but-wr-takes-top-spot/)

9. Trey Benson, RB, Cardinals

Benson will have to split carries with James Conner, and frankly, I love that rookie-veteran pairing in Arizona's backfield. I won't be surprised if by November, the former Florida State star is the unquestioned feature back for the Cardinals. He's that talented. Despite running as tall as he does, Benson is extremely elusive -- he had an unreal 39.2% forced missed tackle rate on 316 collegiate carries -- and has sub 4.40 speed.

What more is there to say? Benson doesn't enter the NFL as an unchallenged No. 1 runner on his new team, but has the physical chops to excel instantly.
 

Latest posts

Forum statistics

Threads
540,993
Posts
5,296,860
Members
6,290
Latest member
stbmd
Top