So ready for VR gaming

Discussion in 'Gaming' started by BigRedRage, Jul 2, 2015.

  1. dreamcastrocks

    dreamcastrocks Chopped Liver Moderator Contributor

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    Most VR games are sub $20 in my experience. They have some that go for as much as a full retail regular game. Most of those aren't worth it though.
     
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  2. BigRedRage

    BigRedRage badass Contributor

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  3. dreamcastrocks

    dreamcastrocks Chopped Liver Moderator Contributor

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  4. BigRedRage

    BigRedRage badass Contributor

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    Not only that, $900 without sensors and etc. holy crap.

    Going with some friends to octane raceways VR zombie game Thursday night. Looks pretty cool.
     
  5. Covert Rain

    Covert Rain Father smelt of elderberries!

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    My biggest issue with wireless is the battery life. Nobody wants to strap on a VR unit and it be dead in 2 hours. All the units need a major upgrade to the resolution. With that will come major power requirements. If the battery units is too big the VR unit becomes heavy. Hopefully, in a new version soon they use high quality battery/recharge design with the option to plug in the power chord when the unit is running low.
     
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  6. BigRedRage

    BigRedRage badass Contributor

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    You could also have a cord go down to a belt strapped mechanism that way you could have a big battery without making it uncomfortable.
     
  7. puckhead

    puckhead Waxing Gibbous Contributor

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    Is that a big battery in your pocket or are you watching VR porn?
     
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  8. BigRedRage

    BigRedRage badass Contributor

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    It's actually my ballcam sir and my eyes are up here
     
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  9. puckhead

    puckhead Waxing Gibbous Contributor

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    'Cause I got ballcam in my pocket
    And the other is givin' a high five
     
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  10. BigRedRage

    BigRedRage badass Contributor

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  11. BigRedRage

    BigRedRage badass Contributor

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    As the first wireless adapter, the only thing this accessory needs to do is work consistently and prove that it's possible to lose the cable. And for the most part, it does exactly that. Having used the TPCast adapter on my own Vive for a couple of months now, there's very little difference in framerate between wired and wireless and there's no perceivable lag when playing any of my SteamVR games.

    Where the TPCast adapter shows its largest limitation is on the fringes of the display itself. The adapter struggles to fill your Vive display with the whole image, so you get these faint green lines on the outer edges of the display. Some users found you can avoid seeing these lines by extending the headset so the lenses are farther from your eyes, but doing so only replaces the green lines with more of the dark space from the headset. Either way, it's a noticeably less immersive experience.

    This accessory also requires a considerable amount of hardware to set up and use. It comes with its own router to set up in your VR room, separate from the transmitter and receiver you have to install and position so there's always line-of-sight between the two. If you want wireless VR right now, this will absolutely get the job done, but it's clear there are less complicated and higher quality options coming later this year.

    https://www.windowscentral.com/wireless-vr-accessories-which-should-i-buy
     
  12. BigRedRage

    BigRedRage badass Contributor

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    HTC and Intel have teamed up to make a wireless adapter for the Vive and Vive Pro built on WiGig tech, making it far less likely to be impacted by local interference or wireless spectrum congestion. Intel promises WiGig will be a more stable platform for the amount of data being sent through the Vive or Vive Pro, and based on our initial experiences with the adapter those seem like accurate descriptions of the experiences being offered.

    The Vive wireless adapter is also much smaller than the other wireless VR accessories for the Vive, though like the current-generation TPCast model also relies on a battery worn at the waist to better distribute weight and provide power. This currently seems like the best all-around option for the HTC Vive or Vive Pro, but HTC has announced this accessory won't be shipping until Q3 of this year.
     
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