AP requests to make names in steroids case public

Discussion in 'Arizona Diamondbacks' started by UncleChris, Jun 22, 2007.

  1. UncleChris

    UncleChris Retirement Doesn't Suck Contributor

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    14,081
    Likes Received:
    706
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2003
    Location:
    New River, AZ
    Didn't know where else to put this..... Mods: Feel free to move as you see fit.




    This could get VERY interesting....

    "NEW YORK -- The Associated Press asked a federal judge to make public the names of baseball players a government agent said were implicated in drug use by former major league pitcher Jason Grimsley.

    In an application filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Phoenix, the AP said a sworn statement signed in May 2006 to obtain a search warrant for Grimsley's home in Arizona should be released in its entirety based on legal precedent and public interest.

    When the affidavit, signed by IRS Special Agent Jeff Novitzky, was made public in June 2006, names of the players Novitzky said Grimsley accused of using performance-enhancing drugs were blacked out.

    "Any privacy interests of individuals named in the affidavit are insufficient to overcome the public's right to access," the AP said in its court filing.

    The AP also said that if prosecutors provided the complete affidavit to baseball steroids investigator George Mitchell, "then they should not be allowed to invoke the privacy interests of third parties as a shield to prevent disclosure to others."

    David Segui told ESPN in June 2006 that he was one of the blacked-out names, and the Los Angeles Times reported in October that Roger Clemens, Andy Pettitte and Miguel Tejada were also named, along with Brian Roberts and Jay Gibbons.

    Players in the Times report denied using steroids, and Randy Hendricks, the agent for Clemens and Pettitte, said he was told Grimsley denied making the statements attributed to him by Novitzky. Grimsley has not commented publicly and a federal prosecutor said the report contained "significant inaccuracies."

    Natalya LaBauve, spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney's Office in San Francisco, and Wyn Hornbuckle, spokesman for the U.S. Attorney's Office in Phoenix, declined comment.

    The investigation of Grimsley is being run by prosecutors and authorities in San Francisco, where five Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative defendants pleaded guilty to distributing or developing steroids, some of which were undetectable in drug tests.

    Earlier this month, Hearst Corp. asked a federal judge in New York to make public a December 2005 sworn statement by Novitzky used to obtain a search warrant for the home of former New York Mets clubhouse attendant Kirk Radomski. The government said 36 current and former players were supplied drugs by Radomski but the names of the players were blacked out when the search warrant was unsealed this April.

    Hearst said that if the names had been provided to Mitchell, they must be made public. Its motion is pending."
     
  2. abomb

    abomb Registered User Contributor

    Age:
    40
    Posts:
    21,836
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2003
    I finished "Game of Shadows" this morning. The paperback copy has a nice epilogue and it is interesting to read these news stories as they further the drama and characters involved.
     
  3. Ryanwb

    Ryanwb Banned

    Posts:
    35,579
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 13, 2002
    Location:
    Mesa
    Jose Canseco is hoping they'll interview him
     
  4. UncleChris

    UncleChris Retirement Doesn't Suck Contributor

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    14,081
    Likes Received:
    706
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2003
    Location:
    New River, AZ
    If Clemens is indeed a juicer, he pretty much becomes the Barry Bonds of pitchers.

    To be honest, I'm surprised Luis Gonzalez's name hasn't come up for the 2001 season. His performance and looks sure do suggest that he "had some help...." that year. Hate to pick on Gonzo, but it is what it is.... We'll probably never know for sure....
     
  5. Gaddabout

    Gaddabout Plucky Comic Relief Contributor

    Posts:
    16,044
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2004
    Location:
    Gilbert
    There were several D-Backs the media had singled out as users between 1999 and 2001. It was very weird spending any time in the locker room because of the tension between media and players during that time. The guys that were suspected were the guys who were billed as the family-friendly players.
     
  6. HooverDam

    HooverDam Registered User

    Posts:
    6,560
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 21, 2005
    God I'm so sick of hearing about steroids, I honestly don't care anymore. They have a good drug policy in place, what good does it do to try to go back in time? When voting for the HoF, just consider this a possible steroid era and vote in the best players of this era.

    I've never seen such a big deal made about nothing, its absolutely silly.
     
  7. UncleChris

    UncleChris Retirement Doesn't Suck Contributor

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    14,081
    Likes Received:
    706
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2003
    Location:
    New River, AZ
    That's one of the most preposterously ridiculous statements I've ever seen. By your logic, we should immediately begin genetic engineering for better baseball players, then juice 'em, too. :rolleyes:
     
  8. HooverDam

    HooverDam Registered User

    Posts:
    6,560
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 21, 2005
    Look, they broke the rules, going back now does what exactly? If anyone could give me any sort of sensible answer, maybe I wouldn't be so annoyed about the continued steroid talk. They beat the system, at this point there is no need to dig up the past. What does it solve? Baseball had a dead ball era, it now had a steroid era, we should just remember the best players of this era and appreciate what they did.

    I'd be completely fine w/ genetically engineering players by the way. We make genetic selections all the time, and do various things (working out, diet, etc) to improve our bodies. But really thats years away, so no need even talking about it.
     
  9. bratwurst

    bratwurst on double secret probation

    Age:
    41
    Posts:
    5,940
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 14, 2002
    Location:
    Santo Poco
    To me, its just entertainment now. I don't really give a rats ass about the steroids. I don't give a damn about needing an asterisk in the record books either.

    Go ahead, flame away. Hell, put an asterisk by my username.
     
  10. Nasser22

    Nasser22 Sec. 32: Go Devils!

    Age:
    25
    Posts:
    4,134
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 5, 2006
    I think they should really try hard to stop steroid use but right now I agree with Hoover. So many people used it that I just don't even care.

    I don't think Gonzo did...I just think he had a few good seasons. He only looked big enough to show that he spent some time lifting weights. Chad Tracy got a little more muscular between his 1st and 2nd years. I didn't see much of a difference in Gonzo. Of course some of the time it is not very visible...
     
  11. Gaddabout

    Gaddabout Plucky Comic Relief Contributor

    Posts:
    16,044
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2004
    Location:
    Gilbert
    This is about bioethics and the hope to show getting away with doping during the playing years does not mean your name can't be tarnished once your done. The feeling is to create the feeling the ultimately you will be caught.

    Steroids are just one of many doping techniques. Somatropin is a much bigger concern, IMO, because it's naturally secreted. There's no test for it, not even biosynthetic somatropin. The cost is prohibitive to the average person, but it's a drop in the bucket to athletes who were on steroids, and it can be stacked with testosterone and used for an indeterminate time period, unlike steroids.
     

Share This Page